China officially unveiled its National Aquatics Centre, nicknamed the Water Cube, on Jan 28.

Water Cube aka National Aquatics Centre in Beijing
Water Cube aka National Aquatics Centre in Beijing Water Cube aka National Aquatics Centre in Beijing
The National Aquatics Centre (Images from early January, courtesy of Xinhuanet)

The Water Cube is one of two iconic venues for the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games; the other is the Bird Nest, which is the venue for the opening and closing ceremonies as well as the track and field events.

The Aquatics Centre has a capacity of 17,000 and will host the swimming, diving and synchronized swimming events during the Olympics.

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A man in Lanzhou, China, has planted some football shaped calabashes to pay his tribute to the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games.

Football shaped calabash Calabash
Football shaped calabash (Image courtesy of Lanzhou Daily) vs a normal calabash

Known as Mr Cha, the Lanzhou citizen wants to present the special shaped calabashes to the organising committee of the Beijing Olympic as a show of appreciation.

Cha took six years of experiments to find a method to grow these calabashes, and has obtained six national patents for his research.

The method of growing these calabashes is simple though… by putting young calabashes into moulds. The difficult part is the extra care needed to prevent the fruits from dying off while inside the mould.

The clothing designs of volunteers, staff and technical officials for the Beijing Olympic Games and Paralympic Games were unveiled on Jan 20 by the Beijing Organizing Committee for the Games (BOCOG), as part of China’s celebration of the 200-day countdown to the Games of the XXIX Olympiad. [Beijing2008]

Beijing unveils Olympic and Paralympic uniforms
Beijing unveils Olympic and Paralympic uniforms Beijing unveils Olympic and Paralympic uniforms
BOCOG unveils uniforms for Beijing Olympic Games and Paralympic Games 2008

Uniforms for BOCOG staff are red while those for volunteers are blue and those for technical officials are grey. The uniforms feature “lucky clouds” – the same pattern used in the design of the Olympic torch… a delicate blend of Olympic concepts with Chinese characteristics.

Looks pretty cool to me.

Some Chinese girls are training at the Beijing Foreign Affairs School (BFAS), one of the state-run schools responsible for producing hostesses for the upcoming Beijing Olympic Games.

These girls, mostly 16-18 of age, are among thousands of candidates vowing for the 380 places as Olympic hostesses responsible for carrying the medals during the prize-giving ceremonies at this summer’s Beijing Olympics.

Beijing girls training as Olympic Games hostess Beijing girls training as Olympic Games hostess
Training like flight attendance, probably tougher though
Beijing girls training as Olympic Games hostess Beijing girls training as Olympic Games hostess
“You need to be like a super woman…”
Chinese girls training as Olympic Games hostess Chinese girls training as Olympic Games hostess
Smile smile… it is said that the best smile is by showing eight teeth
(All images courtesy of Xinhuanet)

Besides the stewardess-like-training, the girls have to meet the specific requirements of height, weight and body proportions to begin with. They also need to learn about Olympic history, foreign languages and other mannerisms etc.

208 Shanghai taxi drivers had grouped together on Dec 29, 2007 to form a display of the Olympic logo, and utilised 33 taxis to form the number 2008 as a show of support for Beijing Olympic Games, which is scheduled to run on August 8-24, 2008.

Shanghai taxi drivers show support for Beijing Olympic Shanghai taxi drivers show support for Beijing Olympic
Shanghai taxi drivers displaying Olympic logo 2008

Thousands of people had took part in a tug-of-war in Changsha of central China’s Hunan province on Sunday (Jan 7), which was staged in conjunction with the arrival of 2008 Beijing Olympic torchbearers.

2008 people in tug of war in China 2008 people in tug of war in China
Thousands of people in tug-of-war (Image courtesy of Xiaoxiang Morning Post)

2008 of the participants were drafted from Hunan University to symbolise the Beijing Olympic in summer 2008; a few thousands of other participants also took part in the competition. Chinese Olympic champions and local celebrities had attended to event to show their support as well.

A cable-like-rope more than a kilometre in length and 3 tonnes in weight was specially made by a steamship maker for this event.

Tug-of-war was one of the programs in Summer Olympic; it was almost a century ago since it was last held though (1900-1920).

These pictures have been circulated online for a while… on how Beijing Olympic got its logo…

The dark humour side of Beijing Olympic logo The dark humour side of Beijing Olympic emblem
The dark humour side of Beijing Olympic symbol The dark humour side of Beijing Olympic logo
The ‘dark side’ of Beijing Olympic logo…

Read the rest of this post »

Meng Jie, a Chinese citizen from Mudanjiang, has modified his bicycle to assemble the emblem of the Olympic Games – five interlocking rings of blue, yellow, black, green, and red.

The next Summer Olympic will held in Beijing, China next year (2008). Mr Meng has plan to travel a few places with his modified bicycle to spread the Olympic love.

Bicycle with Olympic emblem
Bicycle with the emblem of Olympic Games (Image courtesy of Xinhuanet)

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